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VOYAGE PHOTO GALLERY #15

Updated: July 29, 2017

In 1961, producer/director Irwin Allen made a science fiction/adventure film for 20th Century Fox called Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, inspired in part from Jules Verne's Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and the Disney adaptation of that book from the mid-'50s. As with his earlier films, such as The Big Circus and Five Weeks in a Balloon, he used his contacts and friendships, dating to his career as a publicist, to recruit a cast of overage but still recognizable Hollywood notables -- Walter Pidgeon, Joan Fontaine, Peter Lorre, Henry Daniell -- and younger, attractive players (Barbara Eden, Frankie Avalon), although to play the captain of the submarine, he didn't get the actor he wanted; he'd offered the part to David Hedison, who had worked in Allen's earlier production of The Lost World and was under contract to Fox, but was turned down -- instead, he'd used Robert Sterling, a competent actor but one not quite right for the part of the male sparkplug in the cast of veteran performers.

The film was a hit, though hardly a critical success -- most reviewers took it as the modern equivalent of Saturday afternoon adventure entertainment for kids, though the script, by veteran playwright Charles Bennett (who had worked with Alfred Hitchcock during his British period), had a topical edge. The plot dealt with a doomsday scenario that was as new as the headlines of the day, in which the Van Allen Radiation Belt (then a new discovery) is ignited by a meteor shower, and only the atomic submarine Seaview, designed and built by a brilliant but eccentric admiral, Harriman Nelson, can save the world. In 1961, atomic submarines were still new enough to be a serious source of wonder for the public, and the character of Admiral Harriman Nelson was loosely based on real-life admiral Hyman Rickover, an engineer and scientist who'd risen to flag rank despite being a navy maverick, who had developed a reputation for fierce independence in the course of founding the nuclear submarine fleet, and who had become a public figure and a celebrity in the media. Though these allusions to current events were vague and unstated, it was impossible for an educated adult, or a teenaged science enthusiast, not to pick up on them.

The movie was enough of a hit that the possibility of a television series seemed tempting to the studio and Allen, and by 1963 it was falling into place. Allen and Fox still had the models of the Seaview and the standing sets for the ship's interior to work with; and L.B. Abbott and Howard Lydecker, who had devised and shot the superb special effects for the movie, would be available to do the series as well. The feature film thus became the "pilot" for the series, and as a result the proposed Voyage series was less of a heavy-lifting production job than might normally have been the case. For casting the series, he kept one member of the movie's cast -- a young actor named Del Monroe, as a crewman, Koski in the movie and Kowalski on the series -- but for his ship's officers he went for a much younger, more dynamic cast than the movie. Hedison signed on to the television Voyage for the role of Commander Lee Crane, the captain of the submarine Seaview; and for the role of Admiral Harriman Nelson, Allen lucked out in getting Richard Basehart, an exceptionally talented American actor who up to that time had mostly played villains, heavies, and psychopaths in Hollywood movies and spent a decade working in Europe in a much wider array of roles, including starring parts of major films by Fellini (La Strada) and John Huston (Moby Dick). The rest of the cast of regulars was filled out by Bob Dowdell as the ship's executive officer Lt. Commander Chip Morton; Paul Trinka as crewman Patterson; and ex-wrestler-turned-actor Henry Kulky as the chief-of-the-boat, CPO Curly Jones. One other actor who turned up in a recurring role in the early episodes was Paul Carr as Clark, one of the Seaview's junior officers. Allen jetisoned the romantic main-title song from the feature film (sung by Frankie Avalon, who was also in the movie) and commissioned a new score from composer Paul Sawtell. Sawtell had worked with Allen for more than a decade, going back to his production of the documentary The Sea Around Us (1952). Sawtell also delivered a main-title theme that would last the run of the series, that also helped set the pattern for John Williams' work for Allen on his subsequent series Time Tunnel and Land of the Giants, built on the musical suggestion of the submarine's sonar pulse leading into a sweeping nautical theme that suggested wonder and adventure ahead.

Although the show went out in black-and-white for the first season, Allen shot the pilot, "Eleven Days to Zero," in color in order to better match footage of the submarine from the feature film. In the opening episode, the Seaview's first commander, Captain John Phillips (William Hudson), is killed in an assassination attempt on Admiral Nelson, and Lee Crane comes aboard as captain. The series' first season (1964-1965) coincided in production and scripting with the first big boom in espionage movies, and television shows (including The Man from U.N.C.L.E.), and the scripts that season had the ship and its crew -- especially Crane and Nelson -- coming up against hostile foreign powers and embarking on spy missions, in addition to a certain number of science fiction-oriented scripts, and also one or two that were based on contemporary news events and inspired by feature films of the period. One episode, "Doomsday," was essentially an underwater retelling of "Failsafe," while another, "Submarine Sunk Here," was clearly inspired by the coverage attending the loss of the deep-diving submarine Thresher a year earlier. The espionage and land-based programs were probably the weakest of the first season, but they did serve a purpose -- breaking up the action which otherwise would have been confined almost entirely to the interior of the ship and the ocean floor. The science fiction shows in that season often had an interesting edge -- in "The Indestructible Man," a robot sent into deep space returns to Earth and is picked up by the Seaview, which ends up in danger when its now-defective control system causes the mechanical man to run wild; in "The Invaders," the Seaview finds the remains of multi-million-year-old civilization on the ocean floor and revive one member (played by Robert Duvall) found sealed in one of many strange capsules, who wants to restore his compatriots, only to learn that the body chemistry of this prehistoric humanoid race is incompatible with and deadly to that of humans. In what was probably the best of the science fiction stories, "Mutiny," Nelson discovers an immense -- and incredibly dangerous -- jelly fish, a product of a radiation source on the ocean floor, but is lost at sea and nearly killed in the process of escaping; his partial recovery and an addiction to his prescribed medication lead him to a paranoid breakdown and a confrontation with Crane that nearly destroys the ship.

Halfway through the shooting of the first season, Henry Kulky died and the part of the CPO was written out for the remainder of the season. Already, the show was changing, however -- plans were afoot to shoot in color, starting with the second season, and a new main title theme and score -- by Jerry Goldsmith -- would be tried out and rejected in the coming season. Much more important was the early series suggestion of a recurring nemesis for the Seaview, in the guise of Dr. Gamma (Theo Marcuse), was dropped, and after the first season there would be no more than a tiny handful of recurring off-ship characters with whom the Seaview's crew were ever seen having contact. Allen's wide web of friendships in Hollywood and his keen eye for casting benefitted the series throughout its run. Eddie Albert was a major film star in 1964, and he was the guest star in the first episode. Other guest stars on subsequent shows would include Edgar Bergen (in a straight acting role), Nick Adams, and George Sanders; by the same token, Allen had an exceptional eye for talent, and the up-and-coming actors on that first season featured in important guest roles included Carroll O'Connor, Robert Duvall, and George Lindsey. ~ Bruce Eder, Rovi Credit Herman Stein - Composer (Music Score) Episodes Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea [TV Series] (1964) In 1961, producer/director Irwin Allen made a science fiction/adventure film for 20th Century Fox called Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, inspired in part from Jules Verne's Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea and the Disney adaptation of that book from the mid-'50s. As with his earlier films, such as The Big Circus and Five Weeks in a Balloon, he used his contacts and friendships, dating to his career as a publicist, to recruit a cast of overage but still recognizable Hollywood notables -- Walter Pidgeon, Joan Fontaine, Peter Lorre, Henry Daniell -- and younger, attractive players (Barbara Eden, Frankie Avalon), although to play the captain of the submarine, he didn't get the actor he wanted; he'd offered the part to David Hedison, who had worked in Allen's earlier production of The Lost World and was under contract to Fox, but was turned down -- instead, he'd used Robert Sterling, a competent actor but one not quite right for the part of the male sparkplug in the cast of veteran performers.

The film was a hit, though hardly a critical success -- most reviewers took it as the modern equivalent of Saturday afternoon adventure entertainment for kids, though the script, by veteran playwright Charles Bennett (who had worked with Alfred Hitchcock during his British period), had a topical edge. The plot dealt with a doomsday scenario that was as new as the headlines of the day, in which the Van Allen Radiation Belt (then a new discovery) is ignited by a meteor shower, and only the atomic submarine Seaview, designed and built by a brilliant but eccentric admiral, Harriman Nelson, can save the world. In 1961, atomic submarines were still new enough to be a serious source of wonder for the public, and the character of Admiral Harriman Nelson was loosely based on real-life admiral Hyman Rickover, an engineer and scientist who'd risen to flag rank despite being a navy maverick, who had developed a reputation for fierce independence in the course of founding the nuclear submarine fleet, and who had become a public figure and a celebrity in the media. Though these allusions to current events were vague and unstated, it was impossible for an educated adult, or a teenaged science enthusiast, not to pick up on them.

The movie was enough of a hit that the possibility of a television series seemed tempting to the studio and Allen, and by 1963 it was falling into place. Allen and Fox still had the models of the Seaview and the standing sets for the ship's interior to work with; and L.B. Abbott and Howard Lydecker, who had devised and shot the superb special effects for the movie, would be available to do the series as well. The feature film thus became the "pilot" for the series, and as a result the proposed Voyage series was less of a heavy-lifting production job than might normally have been the case. For casting the series, he kept one member of the movie's cast -- a young actor named Del Monroe, as a crewman, Koski in the movie and Kowalski on the series -- but for his ship's officers he went for a much younger, more dynamic cast than the movie. Hedison signed on to the television Voyage for the role of Commander Lee Crane, the captain of the submarine Seaview; and for the role of Admiral Harriman Nelson, Allen lucked out in getting Richard Basehart, an exceptionally talented American actor who up to that time had mostly played villains, heavies, and psychopaths in Hollywood movies and spent a decade working in Europe in a much wider array of roles, including starring parts of major films by Fellini (La Strada) and John Huston (Moby Dick). The rest of the cast of regulars was filled out by Bob Dowdell as the ship's executive officer Lt. Commander Chip Morton; Paul Trinka as crewman Patterson; and ex-wrestler-turned-actor Henry Kulky as the chief-of-the-boat, CPO Curly Jones. One other actor who turned up in a recurring role in the early episodes was Paul Carr as Clark, one of the Seaview's junior officers. Allen jetisoned the romantic main-title song from the feature film (sung by Frankie Avalon, who was also in the movie) and commissioned a new score from composer Paul Sawtell. Sawtell had worked with Allen for more than a decade, going back to his production of the documentary The Sea Around Us (1952). Sawtell also delivered a main-title theme that would last the run of the series, that also helped set the pattern for John Williams' work for Allen on his subsequent series Time Tunnel and Land of the Giants, built on the musical suggestion of the submarine's sonar pulse leading into a sweeping nautical theme that suggested wonder and adventure ahead.

Although the show went out in black-and-white for the first season, Allen shot the pilot, "Eleven Days to Zero," in color in order to better match footage of the submarine from the feature film. In the opening episode, the Seaview's first commander, Captain John Phillips (William Hudson), is killed in an assassination attempt on Admiral Nelson, and Lee Crane comes aboard as captain. The series' first season (1964-1965) coincided in production and scripting with the first big boom in espionage movies, and television shows (including The Man from U.N.C.L.E.), and the scripts that season had the ship and its crew -- especially Crane and Nelson -- coming up against hostile foreign powers and embarking on spy missions, in addition to a certain number of science fiction-oriented scripts, and also one or two that were based on contemporary news events and inspired by feature films of the period. One episode, "Doomsday," was essentially an underwater retelling of "Failsafe," while another, "Submarine Sunk Here," was clearly inspired by the coverage attending the loss of the deep-diving submarine Thresher a year earlier. The espionage and land-based programs were probably the weakest of the first season, but they did serve a purpose -- breaking up the action which otherwise would have been confined almost entirely to the interior of the ship and the ocean floor. The science fiction shows in that season often had an interesting edge -- in "The Indestructible Man," a robot sent into deep space returns to Earth and is picked up by the Seaview, which ends up in danger when its now-defective control system causes the mechanical man to run wild; in "The Invaders," the Seaview finds the remains of multi-million-year-old civilization on the ocean floor and revive one member (played by Robert Duvall) found sealed in one of many strange capsules, who wants to restore his compatriots, only to learn that the body chemistry of this prehistoric humanoid race is incompatible with and deadly to that of humans. In what was probably the best of the science fiction stories, "Mutiny," Nelson discovers an immense -- and incredibly dangerous -- jelly fish, a product of a radiation source on the ocean floor, but is lost at sea and nearly killed in the process of escaping; his partial recovery and an addiction to his prescribed medication lead him to a paranoid breakdown and a confrontation with Crane that nearly destroys the ship.

Halfway through the shooting of the first season, Henry Kulky died and the part of the CPO was written out for the remainder of the season. Already, the show was changing, however -- plans were afoot to shoot in color, starting with the second season, and a new main title theme and score -- by Jerry Goldsmith -- would be tried out and rejected in the coming season. Much more important was the early series suggestion of a recurring nemesis for the Seaview, in the guise of Dr. Gamma (Theo Marcuse), was dropped, and after the first season there would be no more than a tiny handful of recurring off-ship characters with whom the Seaview's crew were ever seen having contact. Allen's wide web of friendships in Hollywood and his keen eye for casting benefitted the series throughout its run. Eddie Albert was a major film star in 1964, and he was the guest star in the first episode. Other guest stars on subsequent shows would include Edgar Bergen (in a straight acting role), Nick Adams, and George Sanders; by the same token, Allen had an exceptional eye for talent, and the up-and-coming actors on that first season featured in important guest roles included Carroll O'Connor, Robert Duvall, and George Lindsey.

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea: Season 01 (1964) Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, created and produced by Irwin Allen and based on his 1961 movie of the same title, told of the adventures of the Seaview, an advanced nuclear-powered research submarine, designed and built by retired admiral Harriman Nelson (Richard Basehart), the founder and head of the Nelson Institute of Marine Research, located in Santa Barbara, CA. Set in the then somewhat distant future of the '70s, the 1964 series depicted the Seaview and her crew -- who were organized along U.S. Navy lines although it was officially a civilian vessel, unless commissioned into the regular navy in an emergency (as in the episode "Mutiny") -- as scientists, investigators, and explorers, as much as military men.

The Seaview is initially under the command of Captain John Phillips (William Hudson), who is killed in an attempt on the life of Admiral Nelson in the opening minutes of the first episode, "Eleven Days to Zero." Her new captain, detached from the navy to take command of the Seaview for the mission at hand, is Commander Lee Crane (David Hedison), who agrees to make the assignment to the Seaview permanent by the episode's end. The admiral and the captain are depicted as developing a close relationship, almost like a father and son, across the run of the series. During the first season, many of the Seaview's missions involved adventures on land, and stories of espionage and infiltration, in keeping with the spy movie craze of the period, although the overall mix of stories also encompassed topical thrillers, drama, science fiction, mystery, exploration, military adventure, and even human interest ("Long Live the King"). The ship's complement of officers and crew included Lt. Commander Chip Morton (Bob Dowdell), Crane's dutiful executive officer, CPO Curley Jones (Henry Kulky), the rough-hewn, gravel-voiced top-enlisted man, and a crew of almost 100 others, most of them recruited by the admiral out of the regular navy for this plum assignment and all fiercely loyal to Nelson. The ship's array of weaponry in the first season included two-man mini-subs, torpedoes, and missiles, and in "Doomsday" it is established that the Seaview -- though a non-government vessel -- is part of the United States' nuclear defense arsenal, and is equipped with thermonuclear missiles to be launched in the event of an attack, as part of the "failsafe" system; introduced in that episode, those missiles would play a key role in subsequent shows in the ensuing years. The program's cast of characters was surprisingly consistent across four seasons, all but one of the regulars -- Chief Jones, as played by Henry Kulky, who died of a heart attack midway through the first season -- reappearing throughout the run of the show. Nelson's rank was advanced without explanation midway through the first season as well, from vice admiral (three stars) to full admiral (four stars). Among the developments in the first season, Nelson designed built a sister ship to the Seaview, the deep-diving submarine Polidor, which is destroyed by sabotage in the episode "The Fear-Makers"; another rival to the Seaview, the Neptune, is destroyed in her shakedown cruise by an encounter with a gigantic, irradiated man-o-war, in "Mutiny." Other menaces faced by the Seaview in that first season included a giant octopus ("Village of Guilt"), a super-powerful magnetic ray ("The Magnus Beam"), a robot returned from space ("The Indestructible Man"), and a devious survivor (Robert Duvall) of a race of super-intelligent humanoids from an ancient evolutionary chain in Earth's primordial history. Despite these seemingly wild and outlandish stories, the series' first season is usually regarded as its most realistic and easy to take, principally because it was aimed at adult as well as juvenile viewers. As the later seasons progressed, the focus shifted much more toward holding and entertaining younger audience members. The first season was also notable for the presence of a fairly large number of women in the guest casts of each show, including soon-to-be Irwin Allen leading lady June Lockhart (who subsequently co-starred in Lost in Space) in one episode. As a submarine in the '60s, women would be relatively scarce in real-life, and this was the case in subsequent seasons (especially after the second) as the plots moved away from spy stories and dramas, and into more fanciful realms.

Eleven Days to Zero Submarine Sunk Here The Magnus Beam No Way Out The Blizzard Makers The Ghost of Moby Dick Long Live the King Hail to the Chief The City Beneath the Sea The Fear Makers The Mist of Silence The Price of Doom The Sky Is Falling Turn Back the Clock The Village of Guilt Hot Line The Last Battle Mutiny Doomsday The Invaders The Indestructible Man The Buccaneer The Human Computer The Saboteur Cradle of the Deep The Amphibians The Exile The Creature The Enemies The Secret of the Loch The Condemned The Traitor

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea: Season 02 (1965)

The second season of Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea brought numerous changes to the series, most notably the addition of color photography -- and the addition of color photography seemed to herald a greater emphasis on science fiction scripts; however, unlike Lost in Space, producer Irwin Allen's other science fiction series of this period, which became distinctly more juvenile when it switched to color, the overall approach to Voyage didn't change radically. Indeed, it seemed as though Allen was willing to lavish an even bigger budget on the show and keep its reasonably adult orientation. The other major addition to the series was a new device associated with the submarine Seaview, in the form of the Flying Sub. The Seaview had always carried mini-subs, small lightly powered two-man underwater vehicles, which were a carry-over from the 1961 movie Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea, but the Flying Sub, known officially as FS-1, was a snub-winged vehicle resembling a manta ray that could emerge from its berth below the larger sub's observation deck and not only move just as quickly through the water as the mother ship but also, using its jets, streak into the air and fly at supersonic speeds. This helped to move scripts along at a much faster pace, as key characters could now span the globe when necessary, and it allowed for action to be divided between two or more locales. Although writers quickly fell into the routine plot device of having the Flying Sub become trapped or otherwise disabled with one of the principal characters aboard, when they avoided this plot element its presence worked wonders in speeding the pace of the action along.

The core cast of characters and actors remained the same during the second season, led by Richard Basehart as Admiral Harriman Nelson, designer of the submarine Seaview, and David Hedison as the Seaview's captain, Commander Lee Crane, with two additions. Terry Becker joined the cast as Chief Francis Sharkey, the tough, streetwise, New York-accented top non-commissioned officer on the boat; and Alan Hunt joined as crewman Stu Riley, taking his place alongside Del Monroe's Kowalski and Paul Trinka's Patterson among the recurring members of the crew. Riley was originally supposed to add some youth appeal to the series, depicted as a surfer who joins the Seaview's crew, but the episode that introduced him in this way was never shot.

The series retained its adult orientation for the second season, not yet falling into the trap that Lost in Space subsequently did of aiming its appeal at preteens. Indeed, aside from the occasional "monster of the week" adventures, there were scripts dealing with surprisingly sophisticated stories, of attempts by the military to take control of the government, and espionage tales that borrowed freely from the work of Alfred Hitchcock in some details -- and one story involving an assassin with a particularly nasty needle-weapon. The episode that generated the most press, however, was the season opener, "Jonah and the Whale," in which a diving bell carrying Admiral Nelson and a Russian scientist is swallowed by a gigantic sperm whale, and Crane must mount a rescue mission. The sets and special effects were impressive enough to generate magazine articles, and it also benefited from the presence of a new opening and closing theme, as well as a full score composed by Jerry Goldsmith. The new title theme was apparently intended for permanent use on the series but was only used on this one episode -- Allen apparently regarded it as too dark and mysterious for the show, apart from this one episode. There was also one episode, "The Sky's on Fire," that was essentially a rewrite of the plot from the 1961 feature film, about the Van Allen Radiation Belt bursting into flame; and "The Death Ship" was a retelling of Agatha Christie's Ten Little Indians with the Seaview as the setting for a string of murders. A few of the episodes were throwaways -- almost generic thrillers, such as "Terror on Dinosaur Island" -- but most were of distinctly superior quality to the seasons that followed. And at least one, "The Cyborg," seemed to overlap in some ways with the plot of the Star Trek episode "What Are Little Girls Made Of?," involving a plot to replace Admiral Nelson -- and through him the world's leaders -- with cyborg replicas. One odd note concerning this season of the show is that it featured the one extended absence of any of the stars -- due to an illness, Basehart was essentially absent from a handful of late-season shows, including "The Monster's Web" and "The Menfish," and in the latter was basically replaced by veteran movie star Gary Merrill, portraying another scientist/admiral.

Jonah and the Whale The Silent Saboteurs The X Factor The Machines Strike Back The Monster From Outer Space Terror on Dinosaur Island Time Bomb And Five of Us Are Left The Cyborg Escape From Venice The Left-Handed Man The Deadliest Game Leviathan The Peacemaker Killers of the Deep Deadly Creature Below! The Phantom Strikes The Sky's On Fire Graveyard of Fear The Shape of Doom Dead Men's Doubloons The Death Ship The Monster's Web The Menfish The Mechanical Men The Return of the Phantom

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea: Season 03 (1966)

Voyage To The Bottom of the Sea had two highly successful and entertaining seasons behind it in 1966, as it entered its third season. It had made the jump to a new timeslot and color shooting the previous year, and the cast remained the same, led by Richard Basehart as Admiral Harriman Nelson and David Hedison as Commander Lee Crane, with Bob Dowdell, Terry Becker, Del Monroe, and Paul Trinka returning in their supporting roles as members of the crew of the submarine Seaview. Only Alan Hunt, who had played crewman Stu Riley, was gone, Hunt having been drafted. Unlike the transition from the first two second seasons, there were no changes depicted in the design of the ship, or the major pieces of hardware used in the plots. Terry Becker as Chief Petty Officer Francis Sharkey played a somewhat bigger role in the action in this season, as he had been absent, except for appearances in stock footage shots, for most of the second half of the previous season -- his character was given more background and development, and he had a lot more to do, especially in his interactions with Basehart.

Now ensconced in an early Sunday night timeslot, one would have hoped that that the series could maintain the quality of those first two seasons. But instead, Voyage took a strange and bizarre turn, away from the careful mix of espionage stories, science fiction, and adventure tales that had characterized those first two seasons, and into monster-on-the-loose stories for its third season, and even introduced werewolves and showed regular confrontations with aliens from outer space and all manner of creatures from inside the Earth. The series, in effect, became much more like producer Irwin Allen's other successful series, Lost In Space, with several monstrous creatures crossing over between the two shows, both of which were produced at adjoining facilities on the 20th Century-Fox lot. This was the season in which adults began to get embarrassed by many of the shows, which became decidedly more juvenile, and even older teenagers started to treat Voyage as a "guilty pleasure."

Yet the series survived and thrived, mostly because the pacing of the episodes was notched up considerably. The stories may have been silly at times, and the array of monsters faced by the Seaview's crew ridiculous, but the shows delivered non-stop action at a breakneck pace, and became engrossing on that level, especially for the relative handful of good scripts that were produced -- and those were very good. "The Death Watch" was a stark psychological drama involving just Basehart, Hedison, and Becker aboard an otherwise deserted Seaview, while "Day of Evil" and "Thing From Inner Space" gave supporting actor Paul Trinka two great scripts in which to star; and "Deadly Waters" offered an acting tour-de-force fromb series regular Del Monroe as well as a highly suspenseful story of a disaster at sea. And "The Day The World Ended" presented a fascinating story about mass hypnosis of the crew, which included some fine special effects footage.

Despite such highlights, however, the series also started to rely too heavily on stock footage, which longtime fans had seen more than once in the run of the series, and which marred the effectiveness of some of the shows. "The Terrible Toys", for example, was a ridiculous if highly entertaining thriller about an encounter with an alien spaceship, which offered lively pacing and some suspenseful moments, but fell down when extensive footage from a prior season show turned up at a critical moment in the story. The series' problems may well have been a result of the attention of producer Irwin Allen being stretched too thin -- in addition to overseeing Voyage and Lost In Space, he had Time Tunnel in production at the time, and was about to go into pre-production on what would become his most expensive series ever, Land Of The Giants. On the positive side, the actors picked up some of the slack in the scripts. "Day of Evil" and "The Haunted Submarine" gave Hedison and, even more so, Basehart, the opportunity to play dual roles that were immensely fun to watch.

Monster From the Inferno Deadly Invasion The Haunted Submarine The Plant Man The Lost Bomb The Brand of the Beast The Creature Werewolf The Day the World Ended Night of Terror The Terrible Toys Day of Evil Deadly Waters Thing From Inner Space The Death Watch Death From the Past The Heat Monster The Fossil Men The Mermaid The Mummy The Shadowman No Escape From Death Doomsday Island The Wax Men The Deadly Cloud Destroy Seaview!

Voyage to the Bottom of the Sea: Season 04 (1967)

Fires of Death Terror A Time to Die Blow Up Deadly Amphibians The Return of Blackbeard The Deadly Dolls Cave of the Dead Journey with Fear Sealed Orders Man of Many Faces Fatal Cargo Time Lock Rescue Terrible Leprechaun The Lobster Man Nightmare The Abominable Snowman Secret of the Deep Man-Beast Savage Jungle Flaming Ice Attack! Edge of Doom The Death Clock No Way Back


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